Cannabis use in women before and during pregnancy / self-report / (STUDY 2019)

  • Cannabis use in women before and during pregnancy / self-report / (STUDY 2019)

Question:

Has the frequency of cannabis use increased a year before and during pregnancy in recent years?


Finding:

367 403 pregnant women participated in this cross-sectional study at Kaiser Permanente, North Carolina. Their self-reports on cannabis use were part of normal prenatal care. The annual results of daily, weekly and monthly amounts of cannabis use during the one year before pregnancy and during pregnancy increased between 2009 and 2017.


Importance:

The results of this study demonstrate that the frequency of cannabis use increased rapidly one year before and during pregnancy. These are results for women from North Carolina.

Extract from the study

Importance:

With the increasing use of cannabis during the prenatal period, it is common practice to monitor the frequency of use. More frequent use can cause serious health complications to both mothers and their children.

Intention:

Examine the frequency of cannabis use (by self-report) in women a year before pregnancy and during pregnancy.

Design, organization and participants:

The cross-sectional study used data from 367,403 pregnant women who agreed to complete a “self-report” on cannabis use. The study started on 1 January 2009 and culminated on 31 December 2017.

All data were analyzed from February to May 2019.

Time:

Calendar year.

Main conclusions:

Handwriting of the frequency of cannabis use one year before and during pregnancy was rated as part of normal prenatal care (within 8 weeks of pregnancy).

Results:

Of the 367,403 tested, 35.9% were White, 28% Hispanic, 16.6% Asian, 6% African, and the remaining 13.5% were other races or origins. 1.2% of girls were between 11 and 17 years old, 15.3% were between 18 and 24 years old, 61.4% were between 25 and 34 years old, and 22% were women older than 34 years.

Between 2009 and 2017, cannabis use increased from 6.8% to 12.50% a year before pregnancy. During pregnancy it increased from 1.95% to 3.38%.

Solution and relevance:

The results of this study demonstrate an increase in the frequency of cannabis use before and during pregnancy in women in North Carolina. These results are potentially linked to increasing recognition of cannabis use and decreasing views on cannabis-related harm.


The authors of the study: Kelly C. Young-Wolff, Varada Sarovar, Lue-Yen Tucker, Amy Conway, Stacey Alexeeff, Constance Weisner, Mary Anne Armstrong, and Nancy Goler.
You can read more of this study at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6646980/. The whole study is in English.

Photo source: pixabay.com (by Boris Trost)